If you’ve heard Ben speak on our radio show or you’ve read his Copyblogger posts, you know he isn’t wishy-washy. He likes to sell, and he likes to make money. He uses email marketing to do those things, and he has a lot of strong, sharp advice for email marketers. If you’re still nervous about selling, reading Ben Settle might freak you out. Which may be a good and useful thing for you.
Those scenarios might have sounded like a lot of work to you, especially when considered alongside marketing programs that provide more immediate gratification -- like list purchasing, PPC, or trade show marketing that deliver names and email addresses in mere minutes. Often, content marketing is used when businesses realize those programs are either ineffective, too expensive, not scalable, or all of the above. Here's what I mean, using the "infographic generator" example above for demonstrations.
Webpages. What’s the difference between a normal webpage and a webpage that is content marketing? Consider The Beginner’s Guide to SEO from Moz, a provider of SEO related tools and resources. This resource, offered for free, has been viewed millions of times, bringing in countless customers who otherwise might never have stumbled across Moz and the services they offer. Or take a look at a case study from the design firm Teehan+Lax. Most case studies are boring. Their case studies are fascinating. That’s the difference between simply putting content on your website, and content marketing.
Copywriters are some of the highest-paid professionals in the world. These are high-income copywriters. Do you want to learn how to become a high-income copywriter? My exclusive High-Income Copywriter Certification Program is currently accepting applicants. Learning the skill of copywriting through a specialized copywriting training program is your best bet. It’s always best to learn from the masters themselves. You don’t need to take a writing course – you need to take a copywriting course. 

I’ve known for years that I wanted to try to make a living out of writing. I even have a Journalism degree. Im an avid reader, so I always study other writers’ style. I quickly noticed how many errors were being published, and how difficult writing is to many people, but how easy it is for me. I personally feel, when reading such material,that I’m a much better writer.
Very nice article. I’ve been writing and traveling the world, full-time now, for three years. I can’t think of an easier way to make money than writing. No costly inventory, no expensive website, and little investment needed. When I started all I had was a gmail address, and a small portfolio. I would cold contact 10-15 websites a day offering my services. Three years later I’m farming out the small jobs, and still have repeat business from when I first started. It’s a great way to live.

The content you create should be shared on the social networks on which you're active. (And if you're not active on any, this is one of the reasons to get started.) Moreover, Google's algorithm considers social signals as one of its most important ranking factors -- socially shared content is a vote of approval, or at the very least importance, so it makes sense Google would consider it when deciding whether a post should rank well in organic search.
Theory #1: The mere act of publishing content on a regular basis does a lot of the "distribution" work for you -- if you consider search engines a distribution channel. (Which I do, considering how often people use them to find content.) If you create content on a regular basis that's informed by keyword research and optimized for search, Google takes care of the rest of your content distribution plan.
Most copywriters thoroughly research the products and services about which they are asked to write so that they can produce accurate, appealing advertisements. They also consider the target audience and formulate their language and style in a way that will be interesting and attention-grabbing. A client may want a one-line phrase, a catchy jingle, or a multiple-paragraph summary of a product or service. After getting a general idea of the client's wishes, the advertising copywriter comes up with the specifics about the campaign.
An individual who wants to become an advertising copywriter has several options for breaking into the field. Some people choose to pursue bachelor's degrees or higher in marketing, writing, journalism, or communications. A degree can prepare a prospective copywriter for the various business and writing duties of the job, and college experience is a requirement of many employers. Other professionals begin their careers as general freelance writers, perhaps writing informational articles, technical papers, or grants to gain experience. By building a writing portfolio and obtaining strong references, a hopeful copywriter may get the opportunity to submit a resume and samples to potential employers.
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