I write copy for the things around my house (my fridge, car, bed, the more boring the better) and try to sell them by their most unique characteristic. I’ll add in some storytelling and emotional appeal and see how many responses (conversions) I get. I’ll even do split testing by advertising in different cities. Whenever someone calls I say I already sold it. It’s a great way to see what people respond to!

I personally prefer things simple, so I think of content marketing technology solutions in terms of "need it" or "nice to have." Nice-to-have technologies are things like competitive intelligence tools, market research tools, or software that clues you in to real-time trends. Experiment with these on a rolling basis -- most will offer a free trial so you can validate it. But first, make sure you're set up with the core technologies every content marketing team needs.
Email lists are marketer's most treasured assets -- and they're a smart way to drive traffic, conversions, and re-conversions on your content. Invest in growing your blog email subscription list for an incredibly valuable distribution arm alongside your sales lists. You can do this, for example, via lead flows that politely ask readers if they'd like to subscribe as they're reading through certain articles on your website.
At this stage of growth, it's also time to assign dedicated leadership to your content marketing team -- unless you want two dozen people reporting to the CMO. Many organizations hire a Director of Content, VP of Content, Chief Content Officer, or Editor-in-Chief to lead the entire content marketing team. This individual sets the vision for the team, secures budget, hires the right talent, contributes content ideas, solves for growth, and helps coordinate with other leaders across the marketing organization so content marketing doesn't become too siloed.
By 2014, Forbes Magazine's website had written about the seven most popular ways companies use content marketing.[14] In it, the columnist points out that by 2013, use of content marketing had jumped across corporations from 60% a year or so before, to 93%[15] as part of their overall marketing strategy. Despite the fact that 70% of organizations are creating more content, only 21% of marketers think they are successful at tracking return on investment.
I was 15 when started blogging about politics and education, then at college I started to write essay per week + two reflections (300words each)/week,. Then I gradually became obsessed about copywriting, mainly thanks to you Neville (I honestly have no idea how have I discovered you), then I got to list building , and every other possible online marketing thing.
You’re totally right! I got my first iPhone this year and, while I do miss some features from Android, I tend to brag about what iPhone does better. That’s why I’d have liked more a different insight instead, quite in the same line as the one of that campaign: have you noticed how iPhone owners don’t call their phone ‘phone’ or ‘cellphone’ or ‘smartphone’? Only Android owners use those terms. iPhone owners instead tend to call their devices ‘iPhone’… LOL
Building this page I try to keep in mind Seth Godin’s saying in The Purple Cow : “Marketing is not done to the product, Marketing is the product”. I believe this apply also to copywriting as you’re not only trying to sell something, the copy itself is providing (or should, from what I learn from you) some valuable information. Somehow, the copy is a product itself.
Copywriting is designed to sell. Copywriting is closing in print. This type of writing can convert a prospect into a customer. Like I said, it’s more about street smarts, modern thinking, and the skill of simplifying and shortening the key message. That’s why your copywriting clients won’t care if you have a degree in English or journalism. They’ll only care that you possess the raw talent to sell in print. Your clients only care that your writing can sell. Can your writing produce results? That’s what matters.
Visual content plays a big role in the success of a content marketing strategy. We've found that The Adobe Creative Suite will set content marketers up with everything they need to lay out ebooks, design infographics, create social images, etc. The team will find themselves in InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, and Acrobat pretty frequently. For a free alternative, try Canva. This lightweight software makes it easy for designers of all levels to create quality visual content -- things like presentations, cover photos, ads etc. 

Your specific needs might vary -- for instance, perhaps you need subject matter expertise in your writers, or coding experience from your long-form content creators. Or perhaps your titles differ, and your "content creators" are actually "content strategists", or your "social media manager" is really a "specialist." Make edits as you see fit, but these frameworks should be helpful in getting you started if this is your first time hiring for any of these positions.


Traditionally, marketers have had to “rent attention” from other people’s media through display ads on websites, booths at trade shows, or emails sent to third-party lists. For example, when a brand pays out millions of dollars for a Super Bowl ad, they are renting the attention that the TV networks have built. Content marketing, on the other hand, allows marketers to become publishers by building their own audiences and attracting their own attention. By creating and distributing content that buyers find useful, marketers increase their brand awareness and preference by establishing a relationship of trust with consumers as they move through the sales funnel. Additionally, content marketing is considered a less costly strategy than some others. It can have a bit of a slower start while your content library grows and reaches a larger audience.
The emotional responses you can try to provoke will depend on what you’re offering and the desired effect you want this emotional reaction to have on your prospects. Negative emotions, such as anger, disgust, and fear can provoke an incredibly powerful response in the reader, but it can be a challenge to balance this reaction with the rest of your messaging—you don’t want the negative emotional reaction to carry over into perceptions of your products or brand.
Unlike other forms of online marketing, content marketing relies on anticipating and meeting an existing customer need for information, as opposed to creating demand for a new need. As James O'Brien of Contently wrote on Mashable, "The idea central to content marketing is that a brand must give something valuable to get something valuable in return. Instead of the commercial, be the show. Instead of the banner ad, be the feature story."[3] Content marketing requires continuous delivery of large amounts of content, preferably within a content marketing strategy.[4]
Read Joe Pulizzi's excellent book Epic Content Marketing. I started reading it after I wrote this post and it confirmed and expanded what I already knew about content marketing, with much more detail than I could ever go into here. Something Pulizzi emphasizes which I originally left out was the importance of focusing on producing mobile-friendly content, since smartphones are becoming the dominant way in which most of our customers access content. Also read Michael Hyatt's Platform, mentioned above. Frequent websites like those of Content Marketing Institute, Ragan, Copyblogger, Michael Hyatt, and Gary Vaynerchuk and sign up for their email newsletters. It won't take you long to become not just familiar with content marketing, but an expert.
The short answer is that she found me and cold emailed me. The long answer is that she was Googling for copywriting tips and stumbled across an article I wrote a few years ago with a list of copywriting resources. (This makes me cringe a bit to share, since it’s so old, but here’s the blog post: http://skillcrush.com/2014/09/18/write-better-copy/) The interesting thing here is that when she read the article, she looked at the author name and recognized me from Instagram, where she already followed my account all about vegan food (http://instagram.com/randlebrowning). Since she’s launching a vegan health supplements company, she thought I’d be a great fit to write copy for her…and I am! It has been a really fun first project to work on.
Your specific needs might vary -- for instance, perhaps you need subject matter expertise in your writers, or coding experience from your long-form content creators. Or perhaps your titles differ, and your "content creators" are actually "content strategists", or your "social media manager" is really a "specialist." Make edits as you see fit, but these frameworks should be helpful in getting you started if this is your first time hiring for any of these positions.
Though I am not writing copy for advertising, I have learnt a lot about writing by offering myself as a copywriter on Fiverr. I was paid to find out that I didn’t like writing texts for web pages, that I am average at writing short blog posts, but that I really like writing long blog posts about more technical subjects (even subjects I didn’t have a clue about before I started writing). Doing different writing assignments for different people and different audiences is a good way to learn it.
There are a number of PPC ad writing tips and best practices that I’m going to go ahead and assume you’re already following, such as actually using keywords in your ads (you laugh, but so many advertisers don’t), and following Google’s policy guidelines (tHiS iSnT aLlOwEd). With that out of the way, let’s roll up our sleeves and get to the nitty gritty of writing awesome ad copy.
I have a challenge here: I’m looking at ways where I can learn Kopywriting be it ad Kopy or email subject lines or social media Kopy. When it comes to developing this skill, there are many ways. I want to know exactly how the pros do it. As Tim Ferris says, you can learn any skill with the right guidance (read shortcuts/crux) mastering certain aspects of a skill (learning a new language, Kopywriting, swimming, anything).
I’ve known for years that I wanted to try to make a living out of writing. I even have a Journalism degree. Im an avid reader, so I always study other writers’ style. I quickly noticed how many errors were being published, and how difficult writing is to many people, but how easy it is for me. I personally feel, when reading such material,that I’m a much better writer.
The short answer is that she found me and cold emailed me. The long answer is that she was Googling for copywriting tips and stumbled across an article I wrote a few years ago with a list of copywriting resources. (This makes me cringe a bit to share, since it’s so old, but here’s the blog post: http://skillcrush.com/2014/09/18/write-better-copy/) The interesting thing here is that when she read the article, she looked at the author name and recognized me from Instagram, where she already followed my account all about vegan food (http://instagram.com/randlebrowning). Since she’s launching a vegan health supplements company, she thought I’d be a great fit to write copy for her…and I am! It has been a really fun first project to work on.

The situation presented in this ad is realistic and something I’ve thought of before. It shows that Citi understands that wealth means different things for different people. It displays a sense of humor without being too self-aware. This ad appeals to your average middle-class citizen without alienating any other party. It benefits from being oddly specific because it makes it that much more relatable, especially as the price of a movie ticket continues to rise.
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