Finally!!! [sighs with relief]. Some good stuff!!! I surf the net, comb seminars and search every paper or journal to find some damn good reads on copy-writing. Guess what Neville, I think I like the fact that I have tried some of these tips before reading your article and for the first time, I could actually say I found tips that resonate with some deep copy-writing truths. From the bottom of my heart, TENK U for sharing. 

Step 3: Brainstorm, then create your content marketing plan. Planning and creating new content isn’t just about mapping and metrics. Brainstorming and asset planning can be one of the most challenging and important parts of content creation. To catch inspiration when it strikes, you need a receptive environment, and team-wide willingness to try new things. An editorial calendar is not only where you keep track of, coordinate, and share your upcoming content, it is a strategic tool that helps your team execute integrated programs that include your content. Keeping an editorial calendar ensures that you’re releasing your content at the best possible moment, and that your whole team is aligned around the release dates. 
With the pace of social media and the frequency of blogging, not to mention that many of your content assets will be used across multiple campaigns and teams, a lightweight project management tool is critical. I recommend using a free software called Trello, which helps you organize your content, set deadlines, attach files, and collaborate with multiple teammates. Another great tool for keeping content projects organized from planning to publishing is Zerys -- a content marketing tool with a built-in marketplace of professional writers. 

I noticed that they have a 8 1/2 by 11′ paper printed and taped on 10 different locations inside and outside the gym that read “$0 down” in plain text. I felt that this was such a waste because it assumes that people’s numbers one incentive for going to the gym would be that it’s “affordable”. I talked with my personal trainer manager and told him that they should put pictures of testimonials (before and after pictures), as well as other messages like “finally get that beach body you’ve always wanted”, “don’t wait until January 1st to start living a healthy life. Request a free consultation at the front desk”. The manager told me new members were attracted by the testimonials on the Mirrors and the messages. He even offered me a job (but I turned it down of course. They won’t let me work in my pajamas)


This technique is particularly prevalent in the legal sector, as many people who file lawsuits do so in the staunch belief that they’re owed something. In many cases, attorneys and law firms leverage the inherently adversarial nature of legal proceedings to create highly provocative ads that can be very persuasive—and appealing to a sense of entitlement is an excellent way to provoke an emotional reaction in your prospects. Speaking of which…


There are a number of PPC ad writing tips and best practices that I’m going to go ahead and assume you’re already following, such as actually using keywords in your ads (you laugh, but so many advertisers don’t), and following Google’s policy guidelines (tHiS iSnT aLlOwEd). With that out of the way, let’s roll up our sleeves and get to the nitty gritty of writing awesome ad copy.
Copywriting is designed to sell. Copywriting is closing in print. This type of writing can convert a prospect into a customer. Like I said, it’s more about street smarts, modern thinking, and the skill of simplifying and shortening the key message. That’s why your copywriting clients won’t care if you have a degree in English or journalism. They’ll only care that you possess the raw talent to sell in print. Your clients only care that your writing can sell. Can your writing produce results? That’s what matters.
Because we live in an over-stimulated world, those in advertising copywriting must employ both creativity and uniqueness in order to successfully draw in the consumer. The challenge is to produce creative copy while also remaining factual. Creative advertising copy that is based on client or market research and works well with the visual portion of a campaign can be invaluable to the marketing of a particular product.

In any case, humbly submitted, I think your readers might find a lot there to like. Also to note, I’d second your endorsement on all the above. I know some of these guys personally. The AWAI folks, I’ve known since the beginning (in a roundabout way, it’s my personal beginnings as a copywriter that helped inspire the creation of their entire program!).


It is common for an advertising copywriter to specialize within a particular industry or medium. Many Internet copywriters provide freelance services to different companies and websites, creating banner ads and short articles that are placed on other online sites. An advertising copywriter may focus on creating material for printed publications, such as magazines, newspapers, signs, banners, and billboards. Finally, some advertising copywriters specialize in creating scripts and scenes for television commercials, radio spots, and movie trailers.
Copywriting is persuasive writing, also known as sales in print, or what I like to call closing in print. Every single day, copywriters prove that written words can influence people to take a particular action, such as buying a product or service after reading the copy. The written content – the ‘copy’ – is persuasive and meant to compel the reader to take action.

At my own company we’ve used content marketing to grow more than 1,000% over the past year. Potential clients find our content, find value in it, and by the time they contact us they’re already convinced they want to work with us. We don’t have to engage in any high pressure sales tactics, it’s merely a matter of working out details, signing an agreement, and getting started. The trust that usually needs to be built up during an extensive sales cycle has already been created before we know the potential client exists.
My big mistake was quoting based on hours at first — because I’m really fast, I’d quote a ridiculously low rate. Now I quote based on the value of what people will get. Because I’ve been in online business for about 6 years, I bring a ton of experience and strategy as well as a way with words. :) They’re happy, I’m happy, and my old “friends” now have to stand in line to book me. Bwahahahah!
Your specific needs might vary -- for instance, perhaps you need subject matter expertise in your writers, or coding experience from your long-form content creators. Or perhaps your titles differ, and your "content creators" are actually "content strategists", or your "social media manager" is really a "specialist." Make edits as you see fit, but these frameworks should be helpful in getting you started if this is your first time hiring for any of these positions.
I just wanted to say thanks so much to Sonia and the whole Copyblogger team for throwing my little blog on this list with so many folks I’ve looked up to for so long. James over at MWP gave me my very first guest posting gig and a lot of inspiration before and since. Carol Tice’s timely articles gave me what I needed to believe I really could make a living doing this stuff. Peter Bowerman got me started on the freelance writing idea years ago, and continues to provide tremendous value with his blog too. And no list like this would be complete without a huge mention of the granddaddy of writing blogs, Copyblogger! I’ve learned so much here, and it’s only just begun!
The situation presented in this ad is realistic and something I’ve thought of before. It shows that Citi understands that wealth means different things for different people. It displays a sense of humor without being too self-aware. This ad appeals to your average middle-class citizen without alienating any other party. It benefits from being oddly specific because it makes it that much more relatable, especially as the price of a movie ticket continues to rise.
Traditional marketers have long used content to disseminate information about a brand and build a brand's reputation. Taking advantage of technological advances in transportation and communication, business owners started to apply content marketing techniques in the late 19th century. They also attempted to build connections with their customers. For example:

Obviously there are dozens of very large companies offering home insurance, and so differentiating yourself in this particular market could be pretty tricky. However, EverQuote has done a pretty good job of making this ad compelling. Note that the very first copy in the headline—a price—is “$97," which helps overcome prospects’ fear of being gouged for insurance.

Throughout this training the instructor Ian Lurie will show you how to write copy that conveys your story and sells your product. Explore the different types of copywriting, benefits of drafting on paper, going over the general rules and optimize the content based on the outlet and platform. The lectures are accompanied by exercises and quizzes that let you get hands-on.
In 1933, Procter & Gamble started to broadcast a radio serial drama sponsored by their Oxydol soap powder. The owners wanted to build brand loyalty by aiming to adult women. They could intermix their marketing messages into the serial drama. The term soap opera was born in this year, and they marked a precedent for native ads. Engagement with the audience was a key element with the creation of this content.
There are as many types of content marketing as there are types of content--far too many to cover here. My intent is to give you an introduction to content marketing and get you thinking like a content marketer so you’ll see the opportunities all around you. Soon you’ll be coming up with 50 content marketing ideas every day. You won’t be able to stop seeing opportunities to create content. Here are five examples to help your mind start percolating.
Ricardo specializes in content marketing for real estate professionals, and he’s got lots of resources for using blogs, social media, and content to create effective marketing for that market. I love this example of a content marketer working within a well-defined niche. (If you’re a writer struggling to stand out, think about the niche you could be serving.)
Traditionally, marketers have had to “rent attention” from other people’s media through display ads on websites, booths at trade shows, or emails sent to third-party lists. For example, when a brand pays out millions of dollars for a Super Bowl ad, they are renting the attention that the TV networks have built. Content marketing, on the other hand, allows marketers to become publishers by building their own audiences and attracting their own attention. By creating and distributing content that buyers find useful, marketers increase their brand awareness and preference by establishing a relationship of trust with consumers as they move through the sales funnel. Additionally, content marketing is considered a less costly strategy than some others. It can have a bit of a slower start while your content library grows and reaches a larger audience.

With a marketing team size of around 18, your content marketing team will be staffed with all the same roles -- bloggers, long-form content creators, SEO specialists, designers -- just multiplied. Aim to have three bloggers on staff, and two employees for each of the other roles. It's wise to have one of those bloggers have expertise in editing, too, so there's someone dedicated to maintaining content quality as output increases.
I have always found that If i have been given a copywriting project to do something specifically like write web copy I usually Google all best web copies I can find and read through each even if t takes a whole day to do that I look for patterns and best parts of the web copy ; making notes about what pops out and try to incorporate some of those based on what the client wants…
Finally!!! [sighs with relief]. Some good stuff!!! I surf the net, comb seminars and search every paper or journal to find some damn good reads on copy-writing. Guess what Neville, I think I like the fact that I have tried some of these tips before reading your article and for the first time, I could actually say I found tips that resonate with some deep copy-writing truths. From the bottom of my heart, TENK U for sharing.
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