Content marketing also provides additional benefits in that it supports other digital marketing channels. It provides additional content for social media marketing and contributes to SEO efforts by generating natural inbound links and building up good content on your website that gets found in search engines. In fact, for many companies the bulk of their SEO efforts should be focused on content marketing.
I got my first writing gigs by responding to a craigslist ad for a blog post writer. The pay was horrible, like $5 per post, but they only took about 15 minutes to write so that is $20/hour which according to one of Neville’s posts that is about average pay for a freelance copywriter. Good experience in that it showed me what companies were looking for in word counts, topics, SEO. It also forced me to work quickly.
Ricardo specializes in content marketing for real estate professionals, and he’s got lots of resources for using blogs, social media, and content to create effective marketing for that market. I love this example of a content marketer working within a well-defined niche. (If you’re a writer struggling to stand out, think about the niche you could be serving.)
Usually, businesses don't completely cease all other marketing activities and switch to content marketing cold turkey. In fact, most veteran content marketing programs typically incorporate other marketing techniques to complement their content initiatives. But the impetus for most of the companies I've worked with to initiate a content marketing program has been the need for a more cost-effective, predictable, and scalable source of traffic and leads than what they've been receiving from their current marketing programs.
It then started off as working in a full-time job as a Technical Author, in the UK (this was 1997). I then went freelance in 1999 , and found a forte in designing Word templates and documents for clients. They also adopted all my processes and procedures in place of their own – great start, right? BUt that was then, back in the steady world of freelancing and commuting. Now though, with the Internet-shift, it’s even better; but, the challenges – though different – still exist.
The errors I have mentioned are largely due to writing too quickly and not proofing and editing well. I have been there and done that. The problem with writing online (blogging, websites, forums, etc) is that hasty writing produces errors that last forever. I can’t stress enough that printing out your copy and reading it out loud is always a good use of your time.
Copywriting is designed to sell. Copywriting is closing in print. This type of writing can convert a prospect into a customer. Like I said, it’s more about street smarts, modern thinking, and the skill of simplifying and shortening the key message. That’s why your copywriting clients won’t care if you have a degree in English or journalism. They’ll only care that you possess the raw talent to sell in print. Your clients only care that your writing can sell. Can your writing produce results? That’s what matters.

I’d like to ask something though. I’m really interested in findind a good copywriting course about online affiliate marketing. I ‘ m currently struggling to connect my informational articles with the affiliate products I want to promote…for example where to put affiliate links,how many etc….is there any course or website that addresses the above problems? Thank you in advance
I’m a mom to twins and my background is Psychology and education. But you know what? I pitched to several job ads and landed a gig writing about car seats, road trips and and gas prices. I wasn’t going to say no to that and plus they were looking for a writer that was a mom. Here’s my posts on my first freelance writing gig. http://www.wheels.ca/author/elna-cain/
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