Because we live in an over-stimulated world, those in advertising copywriting must employ both creativity and uniqueness in order to successfully draw in the consumer. The challenge is to produce creative copy while also remaining factual. Creative advertising copy that is based on client or market research and works well with the visual portion of a campaign can be invaluable to the marketing of a particular product.
With a marketing team size of around 18, your content marketing team will be staffed with all the same roles -- bloggers, long-form content creators, SEO specialists, designers -- just multiplied. Aim to have three bloggers on staff, and two employees for each of the other roles. It's wise to have one of those bloggers have expertise in editing, too, so there's someone dedicated to maintaining content quality as output increases.
After all, if you don’t really understand the product and why it’s so good, what makes you think you can write compelling copy for others to read? In advertising, they stress that you need to sell benefits, not features. Features are what the product has, but benefits are what the product will do for you. In other words, sell the sizzle, not the steak.

Predictably, blog posts are typically written by the bloggers. However, if your team is large enough to have someone dedicated to creating gated assets and premium content -- things like ebooks and tools -- they should also write blog posts to help promote those assets. SEO specialists will also work closely with bloggers, as blog posts are often a company's best opportunity to improve organic search rankings. As such, bloggers should be writing posts that help improve the site's SEO, and drive organic traffic and leads. Their editorial should be informed by keyword research, and optimized for SEO.


Let's say you're using PPC as your primary means of generating leads for your business. You need more leads, and decide to bid on the term "infographic generator" for $2 a click. At the end of your month-long campaign, you generated 1,000 leads and spent $10,000. Not bad. But what about next month? You have to spend $10,000 again. And again. And again. That is, if you want the leads to keep coming. In other words, when you turn the faucet of money off, leads stop coming out. The same concept applies with list purchasing, tradeshow marketing -- anything where you don't own the property from which leads are generated. Now let's contrast that experience against, say, blogging.
Take it from someone who writes for a living: Just start writing. Your first idea is probably not going to be a winner, and that’s why you should get it out of the way as soon as possible. Write out all of the ideas you have for your copy, no matter how silly– you may be surprised at what gems come out of a brainstorming session where you don’t edit or criticize your creativity.
After all, if you don’t really understand the product and why it’s so good, what makes you think you can write compelling copy for others to read? In advertising, they stress that you need to sell benefits, not features. Features are what the product has, but benefits are what the product will do for you. In other words, sell the sizzle, not the steak.
Because we live in an over-stimulated world, those in advertising copywriting must employ both creativity and uniqueness in order to successfully draw in the consumer. The challenge is to produce creative copy while also remaining factual. Creative advertising copy that is based on client or market research and works well with the visual portion of a campaign can be invaluable to the marketing of a particular product.
There are a number of PPC ad writing tips and best practices that I’m going to go ahead and assume you’re already following, such as actually using keywords in your ads (you laugh, but so many advertisers don’t), and following Google’s policy guidelines (tHiS iSnT aLlOwEd). With that out of the way, let’s roll up our sleeves and get to the nitty gritty of writing awesome ad copy.
In any case, humbly submitted, I think your readers might find a lot there to like. Also to note, I’d second your endorsement on all the above. I know some of these guys personally. The AWAI folks, I’ve known since the beginning (in a roundabout way, it’s my personal beginnings as a copywriter that helped inspire the creation of their entire program!).

This certification is designed to build your writing logic and learning the fundamentals of writing for the web. The lessons can be taken by anyone irrespective of their experience level. In the lectures, you will get to know how to describe your business in an exciting and engaging manner. By the end of the end of the classes, you will be equipped with the in-demand skills required for thriving in the industry.
In order for advertising copy to be successful, it must work well with the visual portion of the campaign. Copywriters need a working knowledge of the product, including its strengths and weaknesses, in order to most effectively write copy for a campaign. This also includes using knowledge of consumer behavior and market segmentation to properly target the advertising copy to a specific audience.
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